Democratic Process in Online Crowds and Communities

Authors

  • Caroline Haythornthwaite School of Library, Archival & Information Studies, The iSchool at the University of British Columbia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29379/jedem.v4i2.137

Keywords:

Crowds, communities, peer production, social networks, participation, collective action, online communities, crowdsourcing

Abstract

This paper explores the underlying structures that support participation and reputation in online crowd and community-based peer productions. Building on writings on open source, peer production, participatory culture, and social networks, the paper describes crowd and community structures as two ends of a continuum of collective action - from lightweight to heavyweight - differentiated by the extent of connectivity and engagement between contributions and among contributors. This is followed by an examination of the recognition, reputation and reward systems that support these collectives, and how these affect who controls and who contributes information. The aim of this exploration is to gain insight for understanding motivations and structures for e-participation in these different, potentially democratic, forums.

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Author Biography

Caroline Haythornthwaite, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies, The iSchool at the University of British Columbia

Director and Professor, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies, The iSchool at UBC, University of British Columbia

Published

2012-12-19

How to Cite

Haythornthwaite, C. (2012). Democratic Process in Online Crowds and Communities. JeDEM - EJournal of EDemocracy and Open Government, 4(2), 160-170. https://doi.org/10.29379/jedem.v4i2.137

Issue

Section

Invited Papers