Open Access to Research. Changing Researcher Behavior Through University and Funder Mandates.

Authors

  • Stevan Harnad Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal & School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.29379/jedem.v3i1.54

Keywords:

open access, self-archiving, research impact, open access mandates, metrics, citations

Abstract

The primary target of the worldwide Open Access initiative is the 2.5 million articles published every year in the planet's 25,000 peer-reviewed research journals across all scholarly and scientific fields. Without exception, every one of these articles is an author give-away, written, not for royalty income, but solely to be used, applied and built upon by other researchers. The optimal and inevitable solution for this give-away research is that it should be made freely accessible to all its would-be users online and not only to those whose institutions can afford subscription access to the journal in which it happens to be published. Yet this optimal and inevitable solution, already fully within the reach of the global research community for at least two decades now, has been taking a remarkably long time to be grasped. The problem is not particularly an instance of "eDemocracy" one way or the other; it is an instance of inaction because of widespread misconceptions (reminiscent of Zeno's Paradox). The solution is for the world's research institutions and funders to (1) extend their existing "publish or perish" mandates so as to (2) require their employees and fundees to maximize the usage and impact of the research they are employed and funded to conduct and publish by (3) depositing their final drafts in their Open Access (OA) Institutional Repositories immediately upon acceptance for publication in order to (4) make their findings freely accessible to all their potential users webwide. OA metrics can then be used to measure and reward research progress and impact; and multiple layers of links, tags, commentary and discussion can be built upon and integrated with the primary research.

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Author Biography

Stevan Harnad, Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal & School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton

Stevan Harnad was born in BudapestHungary. He did his undergraduate work at McGill Universityand his graduate work at Princeton University's Department of Psychology. He is currently Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Science at Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of Southampton. He is also an External Member of theHungarian Academy of Sciences. His research is on categorisation,[1] communication,[2]cognition[3] and consciousness.[4]

Harnad was also the founder (1978 [5]) and editor (till 2002 [6]) of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, a journal published by Cambridge University PressPsycoloquy, an electronic journal sponsored by the American Psychological AssociationCogPrints, an electronic eprint archive in the cognitive sciences hosted by University of Southampton, and the American Scientist Open Access Forum[7] (since 1998) and is an active promoter of Open Access (EPrints,[8] EnablingOpenScholarship (EOS),[9] Open Access Scholarly Information Sourcebook (OASIS),[10]SPARC Campus Open Access Policies[11]).


Published

2011-03-23

How to Cite

Harnad, S. (2011). Open Access to Research. Changing Researcher Behavior Through University and Funder Mandates. JeDEM - EJournal of EDemocracy and Open Government, 3(1), 33-41. https://doi.org/10.29379/jedem.v3i1.54

Issue

Section

Invited Papers